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06
Mar

New Zealand Immigration woes continue!

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Study in New Zealand, New Zealand student visa India, Ahmedabad New Zealand education visa

New Zealand government’s move to neutralize heavy upturn of student immigrants has incurred a loss of $261mn annually. The move has led students willing to migrate moving away from New Zealand as a study destination and on to countries with better prospectus.

 

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) Minister Iain Lees-Galloway said the step saw approximately 7000-10,000 less enrolments to New Zealand each year. Which mean the will be repercussions in the income front for the Kiwis.

 

A reinstated review system will be set bring into consideration the capacity of foreign students’ and their right to work up to 20 hours per week while they are enrolled at a university. According to the agency’s estimation, 1/3rd of international students working where under-graduates.

 

The reports state, due to the fall in the number of international students immigrating to the country, some 10,000, New Zealand lost $70m in tuition fees – totalling to $261m per annum. To add to that, strict English language requirements and tests only made it worse as more students ignored the tertiary colleges.

 

The private training establishments were deemed to become unsustainable if these changes were inflicted at a national level. Along with it, polytechnic colleges and IT schools were also running into loss of students in terms of sheer number.

 

A large number of migrating students, especially from India, are a part of the decline seen in the skill level of permanent residents in 2012-15. In the study, it states that the New Zealand government couldn’t crush the impertinences like migrant exploitation, visa frauds and dummy interviewees appearing as a proxy to an applicant.

 

‘New Zealand economy would take a hit if the students’ work rights were reassessed or redrawn, said the chairman of Independent Tertiary Education New Zealand – Craig Musson. A wider practice needs to be implemented while diversifying opportunities for the students and making it easier for them to survive in a new country.

 

If the students’ right to work is altered, MBIE is foreseeing a short-term labour shortage that will affect the economy. According to Lees-Galloway, these aspects were put in place to level out the discrepancy between labour and work.

 

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